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Full text of "Superintendents of the Yellowstone National Parks Monthly Report, July 1919"

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

YELLOWSTONE PARK, WYO. 

THE SUPERINTENDENT 

Copy from 



PILE 143 



U UilTHLI 
R T 

for 

July, 

1919. 



\S 



OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 
YELLOWSTONE PARK. WYO. 

August 10, 1919. 



The Director, 
national Park Service, 
Washington, D. C. 



Bin 



I have to submit report on oondltione In Yellowstone 
Rational Park covering the month of July, 1919, as follows: 

03HERAL COHDITIOHS: 

The month of July was unusually hot and dry. There 
was but .80 inch of rainfall, whioh was .38 inch less than nor- 
mal; and the showera that came were so light that they were of 
but little real benefit. The monthly mean temperature was 64.8, 
whloh was 3.3 degrees warmer than normal for July. This general 
condition, following similar conditions in June, made it extreme- 
ly hard to keep the dust down by sprinkling, and added greatly 
to the danger of starting forest fires by carelessness on the 
part of travelers. But by unusual effort the roads were kept 
in such condition that complaints of dust and roughness were 
few. A great number of small fires were extinguished, and sev- 
eral of them gained considerable headway, threatening at times 
to be disastrous; but they were finally subdued without at any 
time interfering with travel In the park. 

Travel . 

As will be noted by the statistics on travel given 
under III (d) of this report, the travel for the month of 
July, and for the season, has broken all records, \7hile there 
were some complaints of poor roads loading to the park, espec- 
ially from the west between Ashton, Idaho, and the western en- 
trance, and some of lack of accommodations for private motor 
tourists along the route and in the park, these have not bean 
serious enough to affect the travel to the park to any extent 
and tourists are continuing to arrive, both by rail and in pri- 
vate oars, at an unprecedented rate. The public is being well 
oared for, talcing Into consideration the fact that every hotel, 
camp, and camping site are crowded. 



Labor an! supply markets. 

Serious trouble has not been encountered in securing 
sufficient labor for the carrying on of improvement and mainten- 
ance worlc In the park, though it has beon necessary to keep in 
touch with several employment bureaus to keep our crews filled 
up. But the transportation, hotel, and camping companies have 
had considerable trouble in keeping their employees, and strikes 
among them have been threatened on several occasions. In some 
oases they have had to increase wages or make other concessions 
to employees to keep business running. 

Supplies are in some oases difficult to get for quick 
deliveries, and the prices are high. Che amount of work accom- 
plished is neoessarlly smaller on account of the high prices* 
therefore the appropriations based on estlmatos made under condi- 
tions of previous years are not so effective aB formerly. 



II. PKR30KKEL: 



Employees. 



On July 1st there were 288 employees under this office; 
on July 31st there were 273. Below is given a list of employees, 
with class of work performed by each, exclusive of such temporary 
workers as laborers, teamsters, truck drivers, cooks, etc. 



Assistant Superintendent: 
Chester A. Lindsley 

Assistant Engineers: 
Arthur W. Burney 
Clair H. Conrlck 
Robert L* Filtser 

Blacksmithsi 

William J. O'Laughlln 
Frank L. Plumlee 

Clerks i 

Leroy Hill 
Jacob P. Bower 
Andrew R. Bdwin 
Clarence 0. Lauer 
t. a. KaeRae 
''alden H. Pendell 

Alexander C. T.'lley 



Class of work performed. 

Acting Supt. in absence of Ur. Albright. 

In charge of section of road work. 

ditto. 
Office engineering. 

General blacfesml thing and horse-shoeing. 
General blacks mithing. 

Disbursing agent and purchasing clerk. 
Vouchers. 

Orders and proposals. 
Payrolls and timekeeping. 
Information and general clerical work. 
Cost clerk, and in charge of transporta- 
tion and storehouse, 
rtonographer, files, revenues. 




Kleotriolana: 

George ?. Younger 
Albert Collins 
Jamas Kant Krwlc 

Buffalo Herder: 

Ralph V. Rarr 

Buffalo .<ooper: 

Barton C. Leoombe 

Foremen: 

Lewis L. Kill 



7. C. Conohsn 
R. K. Drisooll 
Charles W. Enochs 
John A. brans 
Will Ian H. Perrell 
G. L. Henderson 
Pauntley K. iSase 
Janes B. Small 
Jeate ?. White 
Harry MoParland 

Knnlyman: 

Charles A. Brant 

Linemen: 

Kri A. Allan 
Hans Larsen 

Uaater Ueohanio: 

Bert L. Stinnett 

Mechanics: 

A. B. Or in 

H. H. Highhouoe 

R. Q. Horner 

Plumber: 

Harold N. Jones 

lwlegrapb and telephone o 
Nellie Roach 
Ralph U Shults 
Hath an K. Sandel 

Rangers: 

Assistant Chief Rangers 
Jams UoBride 
Janes P. Brooica 
Charles J. .Smith 
Harry Trisohmsn 



Class of work performed. 

In charge of power plant. 
Assistant in power plant, 
ditto. 

Work with tame buffalo herd. 

In oharge of tamo buffalo herd. 

In charge of section of road work, and 
in absence of Mr. Goodwin in oharge of 
all engineering work in park. 

In charge of road maintenance orew. 
ditto. 



stable foreman. 

ork in oontnlasary rationing crews, etc. 

In oharge of telephone system. 

In oharge of telephone maintenance orew. 

In oharge of ahopa. 

In charge of auto and truck repair shop. 
Repairing autonobiloo and trucks. 
Repairing and driving tracks. 

In oharge of general plumbing at hlqrtrs. 
perators: 

Telephone switchboard operator. 

ditto. 
Telegraph operator and general clerical work. 



Acting Chief Ranger, in oharge of ranger foroe. 
In charge of ranger work in southern section. 
" " " ■ " ■ western " 

" " " at headquarters. 




Plrst-olaaa Park Rangorat 
Henry Anderson 
Court 3. Dewing ■ 
Peter Lawson 

Raymond 0. Little 
Thad C. Pound 
Roby Roy wisdom 
Park Ranger a: 

George T. Dustman 
will Ian Wiggins 
r.hltney H. Seymour 

Howard Turner 
Gene S. Confarr 
Thomas Clark 

Albert L. UoLaughlin 
Joseph Douglas 
Prank B. Rioharda 
Prank J. V'lnesa 
James Rusaell 
George B. Owen 
iilmoua it. Head 

George " 'inn 
Bert S. Reeae 
E. F. Cuahraan 
Dean M. Kauaeaan 

Pord Purdy 
Fred J. Townaend 
iJorman W. Soherer 
Sam Hurl eas 

George R. Clemona 

Wendell 11. Blahop 



Roger C. Goode 
Harold L. Wooda 



Claaa of work performed. 

In charge of trail orew. 

In charge of Fountain station. 

Looking after exhibition herd of buffalo 

at headquarters. 
In charge of Lake station. 
In charge of Gardiner station. 
In oharge of Sylvan Pans station. 

On duty In chief ranger's office. 

Repairing motorcycles. 

Patrolling formation and auto oamps at 

Mammoth Hot Springs, 
ditto, 
ditto. 
Formation patrol at Mammoth and motorcycle 

patrol. 
Checking automobiles at Gardiner station. 
In oharge of Gallatin station. 
Pire patrols from Gallatin station. 
In oharge of Beohlor station. 
Fire patrols from Beohler station. 
In oharge of Tower Palls station. 
Assisting Owen in regulating traffic and 

making fire patrols. 
In oharge of Soda Butte station. 
Assisting Winn in making fire patrols. 
In oharge of "orris station. 
Assisting Cushman In patrolling formation 

and making fire patrols. 
In oharge of Riverside station. 
Assisting Purdy in making fire patrols. 
In oharge of Yellowstone station. 
Assisting Soherer in checking autos and 

patrolling auto camps. 
Assisting Soherer in checking autos and 

patrolling auto camps. 
Assisting Dewing at Fountain station in 

formation patrols, fire patrols, and regu- 
lating traffic 
Assisting Little at Lake in making fire 

and aut o camp patrols, 
ditto. 



^" 



Park Hangers: 
J. V.. Kline 
V.'illlam K. rurdue 



Carroll V. 
Will Ian C. 



Boatwrlght 
Troutman 



Laurence Maaaanovlteh 
v.lllian H. Rarriaon 

Charles H. Y'atkina 
George F. Ingersoll 
Louis Bruskln 

Fred J. -Clntner 
Jamas H. Dupuis 
Oron L. Snow 

Hoi son J. Howard 
L. Dow Hiohol, Jr. 
Roy ?. Frasier 
Kivind T. Scoyen 
Clyde E. Roney 
John L. Tyler 
Burnet S. Matthew 



Class of worle-wformsd. 

In oharge of Snake River station. 
Assisting Uline in checking autos and 

naking fire patrols. 
In oharge of Thumb station. 
Assisting Boatwrlght in patrolling forma- 
tion and regulating traffic. 
In charge of Upper Basin atation. 
Assisting .Maasanovltah In regulating 
traffio and formation and camp patrols, 
ditto, 
ditto. 
Assisting Wisdom at Sylvan Paaa checking 
automobiles and making fire patrols, 
ditto. 
In oharge of Canyon atation. 
Assisting Supuls in regulating traffio and 
making auto camp and fire patrols. 
ditto, 
ditto. 
Motorcycle patrols, 
ditto, 
ditto, 
ditto, 
ditto, beginning July 25th. 



^, A few of the above employes s were pat' employed during the 
entire month, but aa the dates of entrance on duty and resi gnat ions 
of employees are already on file in your office, it is not deemed 
advisable to Include arch a mass of details in the above Hat, es- 
pecially in view of the foot that this information la given also 
in other paragraphs following. -Tie above liat is correct for the 
greater part of the month, and, with a few exceptions, is absol- 
utely oorrect for the entire month. 

In addition to the employees naned above, the following 
list of auch temporary yiorkera aa laborers, truck drivers, etc., 
wersenployed as follows: 








On July 1st. 


On July 31st. 


Truck drivers 


6 


9 


Laborers 


88 


91 


Teamsters 


38 


41 


Special laborers 


18 


18 


Carpenters 


3 


3 


Cooks 


5 


11 


Waiters 


1 


7 




161 


180 







Leavea of Abaanoe. 

During July annual leave was granted as follows j 

Hellie Roach, Talophone Switohboard Operator, July let 
to 8th, inclusive, 6 days. 

George Younger, Electrician, July 7th to Slat, inclusive, 
28 days. 

Appointments and Promotions. 

The following appointments became effective during the 
oonth of July: 

Chester A. Lindsley, Asat. Supt., $2500 p. a., effective 
July let. 

Janes B. Small, General Foreman, $1920 p. a., effective 
July let. 

H. H. Highhouae, Automobile Meohsnio, $120 p.m., effec- 
tive July 12th. 

A. B. Grim, Automobile Ueohanio, $120 p.m., effective 
July 12th. 

Prank L. Plumles, Blacksmith, $4.40 p.d. , effective 
July 12th. 

Wendell II. Bishop, Park Hanger, $100 p.m., effeotive 
July 12th. 

Lewie L. Hill , Foreman, $1800 p.a. , effeotive noon of 
July 16th. 

Bd J. Hanson, Park Hanger, $100 p.m., effective noon 
of July 16th. 

Bert L. Stinnett, Uaster Mechanic, £1680 p.a., effeo- 
tive July 22nd. 

Sonet S. Matthew, Park Ranger, $100 p.m., effeotive 
July 24th. 



yacanalea 



The following vacancies existed at the close of the 
month t 






1 Chief Ranger \ 

1 Aasiatant buffalo Keeper 
1 Electrician 



-6- 









III. WORK OOMPLETHDt 

(a) Construction of Physloal Improvements. 

Bo construction work of consequence was dono during the 
month. However, tha contractor for the under-pass bridge near 
Sylran Pass at tha and of tha month waa on tha ground making pre- 
parations for the beginning of work. 

(») Maintenance and Repair of Physical Improvamanta. 

In general, the road and bridge work consisted of light 
repairs. The nature of this work was mostly light grader work 
and filling of rata and chuok holes by small crews-- with particular 
attention to the main belt line. All roads have been repaired, 
with the exception of the road south of 3nake River and the Cooke 
City road east of the Yellowstone River, but thaae roads will soon 
be repaired by o~ewo working in these directions. 

Due to the extreme dryness and heavy travel, the roads 
became rutted and very dusty. Where conditions were the worst 
graders removed the dust, giving the sprinklers an opportunity 
to control the situation. This proved the only method of suc- 
cessfully getting rid of the dust; and, with tha aid of tha rains 
of July 29th and 30th, the roads are greatly improved. 

after the rain, as soon as conditions would permit, 
drags were need on the dirt roads. 

All sprinkler tanks have been repaired and are In use 
where water is available. 

Tery few bridge repairs have been made. The long steel 
bridge across the Gardiner River, two nllea from Mammoth on the 
Cooke City road, was painted, and alao the steel bridge across the 
Yellowstone on the Cooke City road. Many small wooden culverts 
have had minor repaira. One 20-foot span log bridge was rebuilt 
at the Upper Basin station. 

There are three larger maintenance orewa, each of about 
30 men, doing improvement in various parts of the park. One crew 
at Horris cocnenoed graveling the first mile north of Horrls, on 
the Horrla-Hamoth road, on July 26th. A deposit of gravel was 
looated which will prove better road surfacing than the old pit. 
Maintenance of roads In the immediate vicinity necessitated de- 
ferring the graveling until the latter part of the month. 

The work of widening the road and filling over culverts 
on the Dunravsn Pass road will be delayed until the firat part of 

-7- 



August, ovine to the difficult task of moving the steam shovel 
over the narrow road and old wooden bridges. 

The east entrance road is in very good condition, and a 
crew is now employed in backfilling- new bridges and repairing 
washouts to o ribbing ooourring in previous years. 

The work of dosing and sealing up the two ports in 
the Gardiner Aroh for a checking station is about 50 per cent 
finished. 

The shops at headquarters were mainly occupied in 
placing sprinkler tanks on the two 5-ton trucks, and repairing 
machinery in use. 






The small crew with pack train engaged in clearing out s\ , 
and making slight repairs to trails worksri during the month from ,..»<**■ 

the Cody mad near Lake Butte, south to the Upper Yellowstone, 
over the Upper Yellowstone Trail, thence west to Snake River Sta- 
tion over the South Boundary Trail, ol earing out trees and making 

. such slight repairs te grades and corduroys as are necessary to 

4 make the trails passable for pack trains. Total mileage covered, 
about 115 miles, after July 21st, this orew and pack train were 
used to assist in fighting a forest fire near the southwest corner 
of the park. 

A seoond small orew under Park Hanger Henry Anderson 
was organised for trail repairs and maintenance, on July 19th, and 
from that date to the end of July went over and repaired the Wil- 
low Park-Riverside Trail, and the Rivers ide-Pountain Trail, a 
/"} -*otal,-of about 54 miles. •' 

. A special laborer was employed throughout the month 

keeping the field at the northern entrance watored^1Bt±-the pros- 
pects seem good for procuring a owp "of hay to be Out for wild 
animals. Another man irrigated the fields at the Buffalo Farm, 
and another worked at Yancey's watering the meadows in that sec- 
tion with a view to cutting as much hay as possible, for winter 
use. A small orew was employed at the Buffalo Farm, getting out 
poets and repairing the fences around the lower buffalo pasture* 

y< c 

Trail work, and in several instances road work, was in- 
terfered with on account of forest fires, as it was necessary to 
take men from any source where they could be prooured to hold the 
firee within bounds* / 






A small orew with a light truck wan employed daring 
the month in cleaning public camps and other sanitary work, 
hat this worse was ale© Interfered with on several occasions to 
take care of forest fires. 

(o) MisoellaP ftBt TlT T *— pt "'orlt. 

The park concessioners had more /than they could, do to 
attend to the wants of travelers wit hont /doing anything In the 
way of Improvements, or maintenance beyond what was absolutely 
necessary. / 

(d) Service to the pqbllo. 

As will be noted from the inclosed Chief Ranger's 
Monthly Travel Reports, a total of 24,990 tourists visited the 
park (Airing the month, as compared with 6,580 in June, 1919, 
and 8,084 in July, 1918. The inclosed Travel Reports show tho 
number of people altering the various gateways in privately 
owned automobiles and by other means of private conveyance 
for this month, last month, July of last year, and during this 
season to the end of July. 

Below is a statement of the paid privately owned auto- 
mobiles entering the park by the different gateways, given by 
states in which lioonsedt 



State. 


Jorth. 


West. 


■»st. 


South. 


Arkansas 




2 


3 




Arlsona 


1 


7 


2 


10 


Colorado 


9 


27 


108 




California 


35 


98 


30 


5 


Connect lout 




1 


3 




Delaware 






1 




Florida 


2 


1 


2 




Georgia 




2 


1 




Illinois 


26 


9 


36 


1 


Indiana 


2 




12 




Iowa 


24 




59 


2 


Idaho 


18 


? 


4 


104 


Kansas 


4 


465 • 


55 


2 


Kentucky 






1 




Louisiana 




2 


5 




Montana 


671 


333 


115 


2 


Maryland 


1 









Ctate t 


Horth. 


Massachusetts 


2 


Maine 




Michigan 


9 


Mississippi 




Missouri 


8 


Minnesota 


28 


Hew Tor* 


12 


Hew Mexico 




Mew Hampshire 


1 


Hew Jersey 


1 


Hevada 


1 


Nebraska 


15 


North Dakota 


70 


Oklahoma 


1 


Ohio 


24 


Oregon 


40 


Pennsylvania 


9 


Rhode Island 


1 


South Dakota 


38 


Texas 


■ 


Tennessee 




Utah 


9 


Virginia 


1 


Vermont 


1 


Washington 


117 


"lsconsin 


40 


Wyoming 


16 


West Virginia 




District of Columbia 2 


4DA 


22 


Total 


1269 



J, •■' 



west. 

3 
10 

1 

e 

14 
2 

4 

1 

1 

2 
15 

7 

6 
14 

5 
67 



8 
8 

1 

348 



71 

3 

17 

2 

_JLL 

1576 



East. 



12 

34 

12 

11 

6 



114 

16 

39 

28 

5 

8 

28 

28 

4 

3 

1 

23 

13 

340 

2 



Sotfth. 



7 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 

1 

87 



1 

1 

44 



1174 



247 






The number of guosts registering at the permanent camps 
and hotels was as follows: 



Mammoth: 
Hots?, Camp 

July, 1918 2496 

July, 1919 5881 5583 

June, 1919 1448 1174 



Upper Basin: 
Hotel Camp 

♦ 3269 

6498 6421 
1705 1516 



Canyon: 
Hotel Cj 

3615 

10478 6751 

2805 1427 



DnrlOTjfefcfa' month we have^ao ^aasttrate reoorda of tho 
number of Beetrteuslng the oublio ,os*S^' grounds. , • 




Hotels were not open in 1918. 



-10- 






IY. TORX IH flR00RBS8« 

General maintenance and repair work is In progress 
as given under division III. 

7. WORK BEOOTj 

She only projeot of import anoe, outside of the regular 
maintenance and repair work, on which work was actually begun 
during the month was the graveling of about 5 miles of road, 
beginning near Morris on the Norrls-lfcmmoth road. This work 
was not begun until the latter part of the month, and accor- 
dingly but little has boon accomplished as yet. 

TX. H.AHS, OB ffiOPOSEP WORKj 

Jh» plans for proposed work include, in addition to 
the work already In progress of repairs and malntenaiBe of roads, 
bridges* trails, and other Improvements, and repairs and maln- 
tenaney of buildings, water and sewer systems, electric light 
and telephone systems, and sanitation, the following! 

Development of several additional sites for public 
camps, at convenient points near the belt road, by clearing 
away the brush, construe ting cooking grates, providing good wa- 
ter, wood, and sanitary facilities, and cleaning public camps, 
at a total oost of about 03,000.00, including the cost of keeping 
the public camps cleaned up during the remainder of the fiscal 
year* 

Widening the belt road from Eunraven Pass to Tower 
Falls, about four miles, as provided for by Congressional allot- 
ment, at a oost of not more than $25,000.00. 

Construction of a bridge across the Buffalo Fork of 
Snake River in the Teton Forest south of the park, as provided 
for by Congressional allotmsnt, at a total cost of not to exceed 
$15,000,00. 

Putting up 400 to 500 tons of hay for subsistence of 
tarns buffalo and other animals, amount depending upon the amount 
of good hay that can be procured without excessive oost from the 
meadows that are under cultivation and from the wild meadows 
on Slough Greek, Tanceys, and in the vicinity of the Buffalo 
Fan, at a oost of $3,500.00 to £5,000.00. 

( ^ r 















-11- 






■t, r+*6i 






Til. TOUCXKSi 

Bo new administrative policies were adopted, nor were 
Important changes made In policies that have boon followed In the 
past* 



Till. COST 0? OPBRATION: 






Dae to the remoteness from headquarters of several of 
the crews encaged on maintenance and Improvement work, it has 
been found impracticable at this early date to have a complete 
reoord of the cost of maintaining the parte during July. It Is 
hoped, however, that the difficulties in connection with obtain- 
ing such a reoord may be overcome, and that auoh a statement can 
be incorporated in future monthly reports. 

IX. OTHKR XASnOtS 07 IKTKREST: 

All animals seen were reported in good condition, and 
there is still plenty of good gracing in the mountains. The 
prospeots for a winter supply of hay are not very good, and hay 
purchased In the market will be very blgh. Arrangements are 
being made to cut as much hay as possible in the park for the 
tarns buffalo, wild animals, and for domestic stock. A small 
band of cow elk noted on Mary Mountain had with them 75 per cent 
of their own number in oalvee. "lid animals, including elk, 
deer, antelope, and bears, were frequently soon by travelers. 
Bears were plontlful around all hotel and camp dumps, and much 
trouble is constantly experienced by our rangers In keeping people 
from feeding them. Four bears whloh had become dangerous had 
to be killed during the month. 

Many tourists enjoyed the fishing along the roads, and 
a few who were anxious to get good fishing took time to visit 
places remote from the regular tourist routes, where excellent 
fishing can be had. Dr. H. M. Smith, United States Pish Com- 
missioner, has been In the park since July 8th, engaged in aoare- 
ful examination of the conditions as relating to culture of fish 
and stooking park waters, and has been assisted in this work to 
the greutest extent practicable by this offloe. Notices wore 
posted stopping fishing for the time being in the waters in the 
southwest corner of the park, on July 22nd, on account of a for- 
est fire in that violnlty, started in tho very dry tinber by a 
party of fishermen. 

Tame Buffalo Herd: A total of 81 calves have been born 
in the herd this season, end there are prospeots of still a few 

-12- 



more. This makes a present total of 410 animals in the herd. 
The main herd has been kept on lit. Horrls and other heights 
daring the Banner, as feed in the valleys Is short and it is 
essential to save what there is for winter forage. At least one- 
half of the tourists visiting Uaranoth go to see the show herd 
kept here for that purpose. 



V^ 



Arrests and violations of the law. 

Violation of tiie park: regulations, especially those 
pertaining to use of the roads, and oarelessness In regard to 
starting fires by leaving oarap fires burning and by discarding 
matches , oigar end cigarette stubs, were noBerous. Hany of 
these relative to speeding and oarelessness In driving automo- 
biles were reported and correoted. Complaints that drivers 
violated the speed regulations and those relative to turning 
out, sounding horns, etc, were many, especially against the 
drivers of the passenger oars of the Yellowstone Park Trans- 
portation Company. Sometimes drivers were let off with a warn- 
ingi sometimes they were peremptorily discharged; and in the 
meet flagrant oases, where evidence was sufficient, they were 
taken before the United States Commissioner and tried. This 
method of handling them, together with the constant effloiemt 
patrols of rangers on motorcycles, has had its effect, and during 
the past few days violations have been less frequent. The follow- 
ing Is a list of arrests made during the month of July: 

Arroeting 
P*U» psme and address. Offense. Punishment. Ranger. 

July 4v J. P. Fltsgerald, San Joso.Cal. Leaving $6 a costs Cushman 

fire. 
7 usuries Ha»elgrove,Btitte,Uont. Speeding 10 ft oosts Tyler 
7 K. Thomas, Butte .Uont. " ditto " 

10* F.G.Johnson.Oakodale.Wash. Leaving fire 6 ft oosts Cushman 
19 Bert Kuffraan.Oreat Falls, liont. " " ditto Tyler 

19 Olenn Mlller.Baker.Ore. M ■ ditto 

16 o.y.D.Mosmann,lio;Coesrocks, Pa. Writing name Reprimanded Harrison 

on old Faithful by Asst.Supt. 
21 Charles Taylor ,Klyria,0hlo Speeding $25 ft oosts Frasler 



28 t A. K. Thompson .Rexburg, Idaho 

26 Wm.Jioran,v;ashington,D.C. 

26 J.W.i<inbrough,Dallao, Texas 

26. B.A.Badgett, Forney, Texas 

28 Tu H.Mel lot to, T,lvlngston,iiont. Speeding 

28 vF.S.Bonnell,Hvingston,Uont. " 



ditto Bishop 
Reprimanded ■ 

Leaving fire $5 ft oosts rrosler 

ditto ■ 

vlO ft oosts Sooyen 

ditto " 



-13- 



u 



On July 30th one of tho lQ-paaaongor automobiles of the 
Yellowstone l'ark Transportation Company overturned with a party 
of seven paaaengara, about ij- mllos oouth from I'.adlson Junction. 
Throe of the seven ocoupanta wars badly bruiaed. Tho oaao was 
oarefully investigated, and It was evident that the aooldent waa 
a direct result of faat driving around a double curve. The driver 
waa triad before tha United Statea Cootniss loner on August lat and 
2nd, and fined ClOO and coata. 



/ 



Foroel; Fires, 



Every effort waa made by the rangor forco to caution 
all partlea against careless use of fire, but notwithstanding 
this there were about 100 oamp fires left by tourists which were 
put out by rangers; and, in addition to theee, there were quite 
a number put out by tourist a and o there in the park. In nine 
oaaea the flree got a considerable start, and it coat considerable 
money and much effort to hold them fron spreading to the danger- 
ous point. Thla, however, was accomplished, and no serious re- 
sults have boon had from foroat firea. Recent relna have soaked 
the foroata until the danger la not ao great. The following 
ahowa the location, date and general extent of the nine firea 
that threatened to become serious » 



T,ooatlon. 
Fall River J 

Pi tons tone Plateau 
Bear Thumb station 
£lou{$i Creek 
Spring Creek 
Kepler Casoades 
Keplor Cascadea 
Gibbon Moadowe 
Hear Canyon Hotel 



ate. 


^xtent. 


Cause. 


Uy 21 


11 acrea 


Pishing party 


30 


3 ml. around 


Lightning 


22 


small 


Camping party 


24 


small 


ii n 


10 


40 acres 


Unknown 


20 


3 acres 


Camping party 


a 


2 acres 


rt If 


26 


1 acre 


Unknown 


24 


octal 1 


Camping party 


Comnlaints. 





A large number of oomplalnts wero filed, most of them 
of a verbal naturo, but this muat be expected with the moat un- 
uaual amount of travel. Corrections were applied in all oases 
where possible. The basis of the moat of the oomplalnts were 
as follows: (1) The orowded condition of the hotel and oamp 
at the Canyon, where it haa been neoeaaary for the management 
to turn people away many timea for lack of room to oar* for them. 
This oan only be avoided by the furnishing of additional facil- 



( 



-14- 



It las at Canyon by enlarging the hotel and oaxap, or by opening 
the Lake Hotel and camp, which would take much of the congestion 
from the Canyon. It la now too late in the aeaaon to do this. 
(2) The disregard by drivers of oars of the Yellowstone Park 
Transportation Company for private oars and the rules of the 
road. The paragraph in automobile rules and regulations which 
gives the "Yellow oars" the right-of-way under certain conditions 
is constantly misinterpreted by the drivers; and they have been 
so inconsiderate of other oars that they have gained a reputation 
for miles around. They have been checked so far as possible 
by warnings from our ranger force, and by trial before the United 
States Commissioner where evidence was sufficient, and the con- 
ditions have somewhat Improved. The matter of correcting faults 
which come out in connection with the complaints of poor sorvloe 
or insufficient service at hotels and camps, of minor infractions 
of the regulations by drivers, and other public oervioe which re- 
quires the hiring of a considerable force of employees, is more 
or less hampered by the present independent attitude of "help" 
in general, whioh is mush worse here from the fact that they have 
to be brought in from a distance, and the employers are more or 
less at their mercy with orowds of guests to be oared for. 

Avoidants and Casualtlos. 

Accidents wore few considering the number of tourists 
who visited the park during the month. Some of the most serious 
accidents are enumerated as follows: 

A small boy with the Massachusetts Porostry Association 
broke through the formation at Upper Geyser Basin, near Giantess 
Geyser, where there are several danger signs, on July 3th; and 
was quite severely, though not dangerously, burned around the 
feet. 

James Baxter Hughes, the four-year-old son of Mr. R. 
H. Hughes, of Gueydon, La., backed into a small pool of hot wa- 
ter at Thumb of Yellowstone Lake on July 17th, and was so badly 
burned that he died of the shook during the following night. 
He was traveling with his grand-parents* 

A ford oar overturned into Tower Creak near the bridge 
on July 30th, from careless driving, occupants were severely 
shocked, but otherwise not seriously injured. 

The Camping Company's truck overturned on the road be- 
tween Gardiner and Manaoth on July 29th, without injury to the 
driver. 



-15- 






The Yellowstone Parte Transportation Company's oil 
tank oar, a 5-ton White, turned over on the road about two miloa 
north from Norrio on July 29th. No injuries to the driver re- 
ported. 

A ten-passenger oar belonging to the Transportation 
Company was turned over about 1-1/4 miles south from Madison 
Junction on July 30th, and three of the seven passengers were 
rather severely injured. This happened through fault of the 
driver speeding around a double ourve. Be was tried for viola- 
tion of park regulations and fined $100 and costs. 






/ 



The same evening one of the drivers took a ten-passen- 
ger oar from the garage at Upper Basin and took a load of em- 
ployees "Joy-riding". While speeding the car left the road, 
ran into a telegraph polo, broke down a tree, and broke the arm 
of the ohef from old Faithful Inn. This man was aunnarily dis- 
charged. 

Special Visitors. 

Among the special visitors who cane to the park during 
July may be mentioned Dr. K. X. Smith, U. 3. Conmisoioner of 
Fisheries, who arrived July 7th and spent the balance of the 
month in studying fish cultural work in the park. Hr. Homer j? 
Conrsings and party, July 15th to 19th. Doctor S. B. Munoaster, 
of Washington, D. 0. , July 24th to 29th. Mr. and Urs. Marshall 
Langhorne, July 5th. Massachusetts Forestry Association under 
leadership of ilr. Reynolds, Seoretary of the association; and 
Mr. Baboook of the American Express Company, July 4th to 10th. 
Travel Club of America under leadership of Mr. Hyle, one of the 
conductors for the American Express Company, July 24th to 29th. 
Mr. and Mrs.^Chauncey J. Hamlin of Hew York, July 24th. Mr. 
Hans Suiter, Knvoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary 
of Switzerland, and party, July 25th to 30th. Ur. Raymond Agnel, 
operator for C. L. Chester of Mew Tork, taking moving pictures 
since July 30th, under permit dated July 15th. 

X. RECEIPTS AMD REMITTANCES: 

The usual report of monies collected, due, transmit- 
ted, etc., together with money orders and checks, totaling 
$434.90, as called for in the reports on Forms 10-59 and 10-60, 
is inclosed. Please acknowledge receipt. During July and the 
first part of August there was transmitted to the Service li- 
cense and motor vehicles foes for July to the extent of $31,934.10. 

Very respectfully, 

Horace M. Albright, 

U»le. Superintendent.